Heart Failure

Published On 07/11/2011

Heart Failure, also called congestive heart failure, is a life-threatening condition in which the heart can no longer pump enough blood to the rest of the body. Heart failure is almost always a chronic, long-term condition, and it is one of the most common reasons people come to the hospital for treatment.

Quality Report Findings for April 2013 - March 2014
 Within Top 10%        Above National Average        Below National Average
Hospital Quality Measures Methodist Healthcare University South North Germantown Fayette Olive Branch Top 10% Nationally Statewide Average Nationwide Average
Heart Failure Appropriate Care Score
99.9%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

99.3%

100.0%
100.0% 100.0% No data available No data available
Discharge Instructions
100.0%

100.0%

100.0%
100.0%
100.0%

100.0%


100.0%

100.0%

91.0%

93.0%
LVF Assessment
100.0%

100.0%

100.0%
100.0%
100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

99.0%

99.0%
ACEI or ARB for LVSD
99.7%

100.0%

100.0%
100.0%

   
     
100.0%

 


100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

96.0%

96.0%

What These Indicators Mean & Why They're Important to You

Discharge instructions– Patients with heart failure should receive written instructions that explain their dietary restrictions, activity level, medications, and the signs and symptoms of worsening heart failure. Studies show that patients who are given this information are less likely to be readmitted to the hospital. 

Left Ventricular Function (LVF) Assessment – Patients with heart failure should have an evaluation of their heart function to help the physician prescribe the appropriate medications. Studies show that evaluation of your left ventricular function is the single most important diagnostic test in the management of all patients with heart failure.

ACEI or ARB for LVSD – Patients with heart failure should receive an ACEI or ARB after discharge from the hospital. These medications help to reduce your blood pressure and pressure in your heart by regulating the hormone that causes narrowing of the blood vessels. Studies show that ACEI or ARB medications help reduce complications and death in patients with decreased heart function.

How We Measure

We have a team of associates that review patient information for our hospitals. Our team attends abstraction clinics so they will be up to date on the most current abstraction rules. Our abstracted information is entered into a computerized system that checks the information for completeness and accuracy. Each missed opportunity is reviewed by our Clinical Decision Support department and all corrections are made before the data is submitted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) or The Joint Commission.

Working to Ensure the Best Patient Care

We regularly communicate with the caregivers you see throughout the hospital about the best practices and evidence-based care that we are measuring behind the scenes. We review the care of our patients during their hospital stay, and we conduct reviews to identify opportunities for improvement. We use this information to develop processes that provide our patients with safe, reliable, consistent, high-quality care.