LeapFrog Group Hospital Ratings

Published On 07/11/2011

The Leapfrog Hospital Survey is a national, evidence-based survey of hospital safety, quality, and efficiency. Annually over 1200 hospitals report to the Leapfrog Hospital Survey on certain aspects of care found to be of most important to consumers. Leapfrog’s survey has three overall focus areas:

  1. How patients fare – Leapfrog asks hospitals to report on how patients in their hospital fare while undergoing certain surgical procedures, high-risk newborn deliveries, normal newborn deliveries, while being treated for pneumonia or a heart attack, and whether or not they have acquired an injuries or infections during their hospital stay.
  2. Resources used to care for those patients – Leapfrog asks hospitals to report on their length of stay and readmission rates for certain conditions and procedures like heart bypass surgery and heart attack. Length of stay and readmissions impact the cost of a hospital stay. Resource use is part of the overall score a hospital receives for heart bypass surgery, heart angioplasty, pneumonia, and heart attacks.
  3. Management practices that promote safety and quality – Leapfrog asks hospitals to report on things that their administration and leadership have adopted to promote safety and quality. For example, computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems, which are used so doctors can order medications electronically, have been shown to reduce medication errors by up to 85% because they contain decision-support tools designed to alert doctors to potential drug to drug interactions, allergies and other common prescribing errors.

Leapfrog uses a cell phone bar ratings system so people can see a hospital’s progress in meeting our safety and quality standards:

Progress Towards Meeting LeapFrog's Standards

Willing to Report

Some Progress

Substantial Progress

Fully Meets Standards

Methodist Healthcare 2013 LeapFrog Group Hospital Ratings

LeapFrog Standard University South North Germantown Fayette
Prevent Medication Errors
Appropriate ICU Staffing Does Not Apply
Steps to Avoid Harm
Managing Serious Errors
Safety-Focused Scheduling Response Not Required Does Not Apply
Reduce Central-Line Infections in ICUs Does Not Apply
Reduce Urinary Catheter Infections in ICUs Does Not Apply
Reduce Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers
Reduce Hospital Acquired Injuries
Rate of Early Elective Deliveries Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Rate of Episiotomy Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Maternity Care Standard Precautions Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
High-Risk Deliveries Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Aortic Valve Replacement Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Abdominal Aortic Aneurism Repair Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Pancreatic Resection Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Esophageal Resection Does Not Apply Does Not Apply Does Not Apply
Length of Stay for Common Acute Conditions
Readmission for Common Acute Conditions

What These Indicators Mean & Why They're Important to You 

Prevent Medication Errors: Patients should choose a hospital that uses computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) systems to order medications, tests, and procedures. CPOE systems are computer systems designed to alert doctors and other prescribers to potentially serious problems with their instructions.

Appropriate ICU Staffing: Patients should choose a hospital with an intensive care unit (ICU) that is staffed by doctors and other caregivers who have special training in critical care medicine. These doctors are called 'intensivists'.

Steps to Avoid Harm: Patients should choose a hospital that has a high Leapfrog Safe Practices Score. This means the hospital has put in place procedures to reduce 17 common, preventable medical mistakes. Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare is committed to outstanding patient care. Registered nurse staffing is one component that influences the quality and safety of care. Nursing staffing is based on each clinical unit's unique circumstances (e.g.,  physical plant, patient conditions, experience of staff), the staffing levels recommended by specialty nursing organizations, and most important, the intensity of care and changing needs of our patients.

Managing Serious Errors: Patients should choose a hospital that has implemented Leapfrog's policy on managing serious events (or \"never events\") such as surgery on the wrong body part or death due to contaminated drugs or devices.

Safety-Focused Scheduling: A patient getting ready for a scheduled inpatient surgery should consider hospitals that use operations management methods  to smooth patient flow across operating rooms that service inpatients. These operation management methods optimize the performance to meet cost, safety, and quality objectives. 

Reduce ICU Infections: Patients should choose a hospital that has a lower rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections. Hospitals are compared to the rates of hospitals for the same ICU type.

Reduce Urinary Catheter Tract Infections in ICU: Patients should choose a hospital that has a lower rate of urinary catheter tract infections. Hospitals are compared to the rates of hospitals for the same ICU type.

Reduce Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers: A patient should choose a hospital that has a low rate of Pressure Ulcers (bedsores). Pressure Ulcers are caused by infrequent moving or turning of a patient while hospitalized.

Reduce Hospital Acquired Injuries: A patient should choose a hospital that has a low rate of hospital injuries such as falls and other traumatic injuries (broken or dislocated bones, burns or crushing injuries). These types of injuries can be avoided.

Rate of Early Elective Deliveries: Normal newborn deliveries between 37 and 39 weeks completed gestation. These early deliveries can result in an increase in the newborn’s length of stay and possible admission to the intensive care unit. This can also increase the cost to the patient. An expectant mother should choose a facility with a lower rate of early elective deliveries.

Rate of Episiotomy: An episiotomy is an incision in the perineum during childbirth. The current medical guidelines recommend this procedure only in certain cases. An expectant mother should choose a facility with a lower rate of episiotomies.

Maternity Care Standards: A patient that will be delivering a baby should choose a hospital that adheres to evidence that promotes a healthy outcome for both the mother and the baby. This includes delivering the baby at the appropriate developmental age, using an appropriate delivery method, and following recommended processes of care.

High-Risk Deliveries: Patients having a high-risk delivery should choose a hospital that follows the recommended processes of care and also has lots of experience in caring for infants born with a very-low birthweight (less than 1500 grams).

Aortic Valve Replacement: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement should choose a hospital that has a high success rate for aortic valve replacements and also has lots of experience with the procedure.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurism Repair: Patients undergoing an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair should choose a hospital that is predicted to have the best odds of having their patients survive the surgery.

Pancreatic Resection: Patients undergoing a pancreatic resection or pancreatectomy should choose a hospital that is predicted to have the best odds of having their patients survive the surgery.

Esophageal Resection: Patients undergoing an esophageal resection or esophagectomy should choose a hospital that is predicted to have the best odds of having their patients survive the surgery.

Length of Stay and Readmission for Common Acute Conditions (AMI, HF, and PN): Patients that receive high quality care during their hospitalization and during the preparation for their discharge from the hospital should have improved outcomes in their activities of daily living, functionality and overall survival. A patient should choose a hospital that has a low Length of Stay (LOS) rate and a low 30 day readmission rate for the Common Acute Conditions, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). A readmission (30-day readmission) is defined as any patient discharged from a hospital and then admitted back into the hospital again within 30 days of their discharge.